Tuesday, May 21

Donors Pledge Over $2 Billion for War-Torn Sudan Amid Escalating Conflict

At a conference in Paris on Monday, donors pledged more than 2 billion euros ($2.13 billion) for war-torn Sudan, as the country grapples with a devastating conflict that has pushed millions to the brink of famine. French President Emmanuel Macron announced the pledges, which come on the first anniversary of what aid workers describe as a neglected but devastating conflict.

Efforts to assist those affected by the war have been hindered by continued fighting between the army and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF), restrictions imposed by the warring sides, and competing demands from other global crises, including in Gaza and Ukraine.

Conflict in Sudan is threatening to escalate further, with fighting intensifying in and around al-Fashir, a besieged aid hub and the last city in the western Darfur region not taken over by the RSF. Hundreds of thousands of displaced people have sought refuge in the area.

The EU pledged 350 million euros, while France and Germany committed 110 million euros and 244 million euros respectively. The United States pledged $147 million and Britain $110 million.

Macron emphasized the need to coordinate international efforts to resolve the conflict and to stop foreign support for the warring parties. “Unfortunately, the amount that we mobilized today is still probably less than was mobilized by several powers since the start of the war to help one or the other side kill each other,” he said.

As regional powers compete for influence in Sudan, U.N. experts say allegations that the United Arab Emirates helped arm the RSF are credible, while sources say the army has received weapons from Iran. Both sides have denied the reports.

The war, which broke out between the Sudanese army and the RSF as they vied for power ahead of a planned transition, has crippled infrastructure, displaced more than 8.5 million people, and cut many off from food supplies and basic services.

The international aid effort faces obstacles in gaining access on the ground. The army has said it would not allow aid into areas controlled by its foes from the RSF, and aid agencies have accused the RSF of looting aid. Both sides have denied holding up relief.

The United Nations is seeking $2.7 billion this year for aid inside Sudan, where 25 million people need assistance, an appeal that was just 6% funded before the Paris meeting. It is also seeking another $1.4 billion for assistance in neighboring countries that have housed hundreds of thousands of refugees.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned on Monday that any attack on al-Fashir could lead to “full-blown intercommunal conflict” in Darfur.

Donors Pledge Over $2 Billion for War-Torn Sudan Amid Escalating Conflict

At a conference in Paris on Monday, donors pledged more than 2 billion euros ($2.13 billion) for war-torn Sudan, as the country grapples with a devastating conflict that has pushed millions to the brink of famine. French President Emmanuel Macron announced the pledges, which come on the first anniversary of what aid workers describe as a neglected but devastating conflict.

Efforts to assist those affected by the war have been hindered by continued fighting between the army and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF), restrictions imposed by the warring sides, and competing demands from other global crises, including in Gaza and Ukraine.

Conflict in Sudan is threatening to escalate further, with fighting intensifying in and around al-Fashir, a besieged aid hub and the last city in the western Darfur region not taken over by the RSF. Hundreds of thousands of displaced people have sought refuge in the area.

The EU pledged 350 million euros, while France and Germany committed 110 million euros and 244 million euros respectively. The United States pledged $147 million and Britain $110 million.

Macron emphasized the need to coordinate international efforts to resolve the conflict and to stop foreign support for the warring parties. “Unfortunately, the amount that we mobilized today is still probably less than was mobilized by several powers since the start of the war to help one or the other side kill each other,” he said.

As regional powers compete for influence in Sudan, U.N. experts say allegations that the United Arab Emirates helped arm the RSF are credible, while sources say the army has received weapons from Iran. Both sides have denied the reports.

The war, which broke out between the Sudanese army and the RSF as they vied for power ahead of a planned transition, has crippled infrastructure, displaced more than 8.5 million people, and cut many off from food supplies and basic services.

The international aid effort faces obstacles in gaining access on the ground. The army has said it would not allow aid into areas controlled by its foes from the RSF, and aid agencies have accused the RSF of looting aid. Both sides have denied holding up relief.

The United Nations is seeking $2.7 billion this year for aid inside Sudan, where 25 million people need assistance, an appeal that was just 6% funded before the Paris meeting. It is also seeking another $1.4 billion for assistance in neighboring countries that have housed hundreds of thousands of refugees.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned on Monday that any attack on al-Fashir could lead to “full-blown intercommunal conflict” in Darfur.